Helpful gift ideas for chemo patients

I’ve not blogged for a bit—not been feeling it since my friend discovered she has cancer. Hold on—this is not going to be a sad blog post—I’m sharing something I made for her that she really found helpful and I want to spread the word that it may be welcomed by loved ones who are undergoing chemotherapy.

When she told me she’d be having chemo treatments, I did some internet research on what I could do. I found several pins about chemo care hats and care packages and created a board of Chemo Patterns and Gift Tips.  So, I did a little shopping and put together a chemo care bag of items she might find helpful:

  • Lubriderm lotion
  • Aquaphor lotion
  • hand sanitizer
  • Lemon Heads hard candies (lessens the metallic taste during chemo)
  • travel pack of Kleenex
  • fuzzy socks with non-slip bottoms
  • lip balm
  • knitted cap
  • t-shirt head scarves in colors she typically wears (easy to make video tutorial here)
  • Crossword puzzle book with pens (chemo takes several hours)

I also knit her a shawl (Ravelry page with details here):

While surfing Pinterest for ideas, I discovered a little pillow that Velcros onto a seatbelt so it doesn’t rub uncomfortably over the chemo patient’s port. Here’s the pin with FREE pattern and tutorial that inspired me to make a seatbelt port pillow for her. This project is very easy and would make much appreciated charity gifts for those with a port implant.

And here’s what I made:

Because the Velcro is attached at the sides, the pillow is reversible

The fabric is 100% cotton flannel in a pretty print that I picked up in the remnants section of JoAnn. I purchased the Velcro there as well with one of their usual percent-off coupons. The poly stuffing, I had already. So this was an affordable project to sew.

I decided two Velcro strips would make the pillow stay in place better. Very easy to make, but, according to my friend, so appreciated because it spares her the irritation of a seatbelt rubbing over the port area. She also added that friends who either had or knew someone with a chemo port had never seen this, but thought it was a great idea. So I’m spreading the word for more folks to be aware of these.

My intention is that this will help someone you know or would be a great charity item for a group to make. If children are too young to sew, or if you have a group, the pillows could be pre-sewn and volunteers can add the stuffing, then the small opening could later be quickly sewn closed on a machine.

I can’t fix my friend’s cancer, but I like to think that at least I can make her chemo treatments a tiny bit more bearable with these gifts.

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2 comments

  1. this is definitely a “make lemonade out of lemons” post. i love it!

    thank you for all the practical ideas. i’m bookmarking this and hope i never need it 🙂

    i hope your friend knows how lucky she is!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Jody! 💕Yes, she’s a wonderful friend who appreciates handmades. I’m lucky to have her as a friend! And I definitely hope you never need to refer back to this post, but please feel free to share with those who could use it. Thanks for your kind words. 🤗

      Like

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